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Thursday, April 28, 2016

Film Review: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof



Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 1958, Directed by Richard Brooks, 108min, Romance, Drama, My Rating=5
Source: gifted to me

Just one pillow on her bed ... and just one desire in her heart!

Brick, an alcoholic ex-football player, drinks his days away and resists the affections of his wife, Maggie. His reunion with his father, Big Daddy, who is dying of cancer, jogs a host of memories and revelations for both father and son.

Wow! What a treat this was to see. Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor was freakin' sexy! Raunchy movies of today has nothing on this film. Nothing was revealed here but goodness, my TV screen was smoldering from the onscreen passion that was in between the lines. I just about died at the ending! Fudge, I think I came! ;) --But really I also was enthralled at the family dynamics. I had several giggles (Mae character) and happy with how it was wrapped up in the end. Oh, I'll have to tell my two youngest kids that their favorite Primary song, "Sunbeam" was sung here. --Last but certainly not least, I dub Paul Newman as my McSexy!

THE BOOK:
I haven't read it yet but now I want to!


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof first heated up Broadway in 1955 with its gothic American story of brothers vying for their dying father’s inheritance amid a whirlwind of sexuality, untethered in the person of Maggie the Cat. The play also daringly showcased the burden of sexuality repressed in the agony of her husband, Brick Pollitt. In spite of the public controversy Cat stirred up, it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Drama Critics Circle Award for that year. Williams, as he so often did with his plays, rewrote Cat on a Hot Tin Roof for many years—the present version was originally produced at the American Shakespeare Festival in 1974 with all the changes that made Williams finally declare the text to be definitive, and was most recently produced on Broadway in the 2003–2004 season. This definitive edition also includes Williams&rsquoi; essay “Person-to-Person,” Williams’ notes on the various endings, and a short chronology of the author’s life. One of America’s greatest living playwrights, as well as a friend and colleague of Williams, Edward Albee has written a concise introduction to the play from a playwright’s perspective, examining the candor, sensuality, power, and impact of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof then and now.






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