Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Z is for Zeus

Got to end this challenge with the Big Guy ... God of the sky, lightning, thunder, law, order, justice ..Mr. Zeus!

This is a challenge to post every day in April (except on Sundays) blogging thematically from A to Z. Go HERE for details. My A-Z theme this year is Greek Mythology inspired by the book The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan that I recently read.  Please be aware that what I write is my interpretation of my findings and may not necessarily be accurate are straight quotes.
Also, "Featured Book" at the end of these posts are books I've reviewed in this book blog, coinciding with the letter of the day.


  • The "Father of Gods and men" who rules the Olympians of Mount Olympus as a father rules the family according to the ancient Greek religion, and modern Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionism.
  • He is the god of sky and thunder. 
  • The child of Cronus and Rhea, and the youngest of his siblings.
  • In most traditions he is married to Hera, although, at the oracle of Dodona, his consort is Dione: according to the Iliad, he is the father of Aphrodite by Dione.
  • He is known for his erotic escapades. These resulted in many godly and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo and Artemis, Hermes, Persephone (by Demeter), Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses (by Mnemosyne); by Hera, he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus.
  • His symbols are the thunderbolt, eagle, bull, and oak.
  • In addition to his Indo-European inheritance, the classical "cloud-gatherer" also derives certain iconographic traits from the cultures of the Ancient Near East, such as the scepter.
  • Frequently depicted by Greek artists in one of two poses: standing, striding forward, with a thunderbolt leveled in his raised right hand, or seated in majesty.
  • After the battle with the Titans, Zeus shared the world with his elder brothers, Poseidon and Hades, by drawing lots: Zeus got the sky and air, Poseidon the waters, and Hades the world of the dead (the underworld).
  • The ancient Earth, Gaia, could not be claimed; she was left to all three, each according to their capabilities, which explains why Poseidon was the "earth-shaker" (the god of earthquakes) and Hades claimed the humans that died (see also Penthus).
  • Gaia resented the way Zeus had treated the Titans, because they were her children. Soon after taking the throne as king of the gods, Zeus had to fight some of Gaia's other children, the monsters Typhon and Echidna. He vanquished Typhon and trapped him under Mount Etna, but left Echidna and her children alive.



Featured Book:

Zomo the Rabbit by Gerald McDermott

My Rating: 4

Now time to do the HAPPY DANCE!!!



  1. I knew Zeus would pop up here today!

    Congrats on finishing.

  2. Impressive, Jinky!! You deserve to do the happy dance. I learned a lot this month so thanks for sharing!


Thank you for taking the time to write a comment. You are fabulous! :)

Template by:
Free Blog Templates